EPA Announces Funding for Water Reuse and Conservation Research

Research will measure health and ecological impacts of water conservation practices
EPA Announces Funding for Water Reuse and Conservation Research
To help promote sustainable water reuse, this research will evaluate how reclaimed water applications such as drinking water reuse, replenishing groundwater, and irrigation can affect public and ecological health.

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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $3.3 million in funding to five institutions to research human and ecological health impacts associated with water reuse and conservation practices. 

“Increasing demand for water resources is putting pressure on the finite supply of drinking water in some areas of the United States,” says Thomas A. Burke, EPA science advisor and deputy assistant administrator of EPA’s Office of Research and Development. “The research announced today will help us manage and make efficient use of the water supply in the long term.”

Water conservation practices that promote water reuse are becoming increasingly important, especially in the western United States, where factors such as climate change, extreme drought, and population growth are decreasing water availability. To help promote sustainable water reuse, this research will evaluate how reclaimed water applications such as drinking water reuse, replenishing groundwater, and irrigation can affect public and ecological health.

EPA announced these grants in conjunction with the White House Water Summit, which was held to raise awareness of water issues and potential solutions in the United States, and to catalyze ideas and actions to help build a sustainable and secure water future through innovative science and technology.

The following institutions received funding through EPA’s Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program:

  • Water Environment Research Foundation (Alexandria, Virginia) to actively identify contaminant hotspots, assess the impact of those hotspots on human and ecological health, and quantify the impact of water reuse and management solutions.
  • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, Illinois) to develop a new framework to understand how adaptive UV and solar-based disinfection systems reduce the persistence of viral pathogens in wastewater for sustainable reuse.
  • Utah State University (Logan, Utah) to assess the impacts and benefits of stormwater harvesting using Managed Aquifer Recharge to develop new water supplies in arid western urban ecosystems.
  • University of Nevada (Las Vegas, Nevada) to quantify microbial risk and compare the sustainability of indirect and direct potable water reuse systems in the United States.
  • University of California Riverside (Riverside, California) to measure levels of contaminants of emerging concern in common vegetables and other food crops irrigated with treated wastewater, and to evaluate human dietary exposure.

More information on these grants is available at: https://cfpub.epa.gov/ncer_abstracts/index.cfm/fuseaction/recipients.display/rfa_id/591/records_per_page/ALL



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