A Photographic Salute to Municipal Sewer and Water Work

Check out these awesome photos we didn't get a chance to use in our print magazine

A Photographic Salute to Municipal Sewer and Water Work

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If a picture is worth a thousand words, what are a thousand pictures worth?

Over the years, Municipal Sewer & Water magazine’s photographers have captured thousands of photos of utility crews doing their jobs, and only a small fraction of those ever see the light of day on our pages. It’s time we start putting them to use.

Here are a few of our favorite unpublished photos from the first half of 2018, along with a little background information to set the scene.


Understanding the Energy of Water — Centerville City, Utah

Randy Randall, director of Public Works for Centerville City, Utah, has an enthusiastic approach to his job that helped earn the utility recognition for its accomplishments. His understanding of the energy inherent in moving water and passion for meticulous testing has saved the city hundreds of thousands of dollars in power costs. Here, Randall shows how using a small Baldour Reliance Super E Motor to pump at a lower pressure than is traditional helps to pump water in circles and keep the system pressurized, saving demand charges. (Photo By Sallie Shatz)
Randy Randall, director of Public Works for Centerville City, Utah, has an enthusiastic approach to his job that helped earn the utility recognition for its accomplishments. His understanding of the energy inherent in moving water and passion for meticulous testing has saved the city hundreds of thousands of dollars in power costs. Here, Randall shows how using a small Baldour Reliance Super E Motor to pump at a lower pressure than is traditional helps to pump water in circles and keep the system pressurized, saving demand charges. (Photo By Sallie Shatz)


There's No Challenge Too Tough — Roseburg, Oregon

After being tasked with taking the Roseburg Urban Sanitary Authority’s 160-mile system from a 10-year inspection cycle to a seven-year cycle, system operator Dean Ronk had his work cut out for him. But somehow, he has managed to get through it on a 6.4-year completion while running the program on his own. Above, Ronk is replacing a manhole after using a combination machine to clean a sewer line. (Photo By Ethan Rocke)
After being tasked with taking the Roseburg Urban Sanitary Authority’s 160-mile system from a 10-year inspection cycle to a seven-year cycle, system operator Dean Ronk had his work cut out for him. But somehow, he has managed to get through it on a 6.4-year completion while running the program on his own. Above, Ronk is replacing a manhole after using a combination machine to clean a sewer line. (Photo By Ethan Rocke)


The Insight of a Water Authority Veteran — Dickinson, North Dakota

Southwest Water Authority operator Dan Roller has been around almost as long as the system he serves. He’s helped build it from the ground up over the course of the last 24 years, and he’s still going strong keeping it running. That’s part of the reason he was named 2017 Outstanding Water Works Employee of the Year by the North Dakota Rural Water System Association. Here he is conducting an inspection of the Ray Christensen Pump Station Backup Generator. He routinely checks the generator’s oil levels, coolant heater and batteries, and looks for leaks.
Southwest Water Authority operator Dan Roller has been around almost as long as the system he serves. He’s helped build it from the ground up over the course of the last 24 years, and he’s still going strong keeping it running. That’s part of the reason he was named 2017 Outstanding Water Works Employee of the Year by the North Dakota Rural Water System Association. Here he is conducting an inspection of the Ray Christensen Pump Station Backup Generator. He routinely checks the generator’s oil levels, coolant heater and batteries, and looks for leaks.


Getting Water Loss Under Control — Calgary, Alberta

The Rocky View Water Co-op was founded to serve a dozen residents and agricultural customers in a rural area just northwest of Calgary. But it suffered growing pains. An initial water audit in 2014 estimated system water loss at more than 41 percent. Since then, through various efforts, the co-op has cut that figure in half. Above, lead operator George Grosariu works with an acoustic listening device for detection on a curb stop. (Photo By Mike Ridewood)
The Rocky View Water Co-op was founded to serve a dozen residents and agricultural customers in a rural area just northwest of Calgary. But it suffered growing pains. An initial water audit in 2014 estimated system water loss at more than 41 percent. Since then, through various efforts, the co-op has cut that figure in half. Above, lead operator George Grosariu works with an acoustic listening device for detection on a curb stop. (Photo By Mike Ridewood)


Saving the System  — Fallbrook, California

A solid strategic plan has turned around the Rainbow Municipal Water District since it almost shut down in 2013 due to high staff turnover, board instability, lack of direction and a hostile takeover attempt by a neighboring agency. Here, employee Chris Hand performs lift station maintenance using one of the district’s Vactor trucks. (Photo By Collin Chappelle)
A solid strategic plan has turned around the Rainbow Municipal Water District since it almost shut down in 2013 due to high staff turnover, board instability, lack of direction and a hostile takeover attempt by a neighboring agency. Here, employee Chris Hand performs lift station maintenance using one of the district’s Vactor trucks. (Photo By Collin Chappelle)


City Buyout Brings Peace of Mind — Bellevue, Wisconsin

A buyout from the city allowed Great Lakes TV Seal Inc. to build a nice new office in their old facility, and gave co-owner Brett Healy peace of mind knowing he’ll have steady work now that he’s out of the private sector. Here, Healy uses an IBAK T76 Inspection Unit outfitted with a IBAK Orpheus camera in the control room on routine inspection. (Photo By Mike Roemer)
A buyout from the city allowed Great Lakes TV Seal Inc. to build a nice new office in their old facility, and gave co-owner Brett Healy peace of mind knowing he’ll have steady work now that he’s out of the private sector. Here, Healy uses an IBAK T76 Inspection Unit outfitted with a IBAK Orpheus camera in the control room on routine inspection. (Photo By Mike Roemer)


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